Marine Turbines In Orkney

Marine Turbines In Orkney

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    Lucky1
    Lucky1 commented on the group Marine Turbines In Orkney's wall:
    16 September 2013 Information from Xodusgroup Xodus celebrates development consent for the MeyGen tidal energy project in the Pentland Firth Independent, international energy consultancy Xodus Group is delighted to hear the ...
    1 year ago
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    Lucky1
    Lucky1 commented on the group Marine Turbines In Orkney's wall:
    Information from Website: www.alstom.com Alstom’s tidal turbine reaches 1MW in offshore conditions 31/07/2013 From its immersion in January 2013, at the European Marine Energy Centre (EMEC) in Orkney, Scotland, Alstom’s ...
    1 year ago
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    Lucky1
    Lucky1 commented on the group Marine Turbines In Orkney's wall:
    Information from BBC News http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-23146280 E.ON pulls out of Orkney Pelamis marine energy project The German power giant E.ON is pulling out of a marine energy research project in ...
    1 year ago
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    Lucky1
    Lucky1 commented on the group Marine Turbines In Orkney's wall:
    EMEC celebrates tenth anniversary Press release from EMEC: The European Marine Energy Centre – the world’s first and only test centre for wave and tidal energy devices – celebrates its tenth anniversary this month, with the pioneering Orkney ...
    1 year ago
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    Lucky1
    Lucky1 commented on the group Marine Turbines In Orkney's wall:
    Wednesday, April 24, 2013 The Crown Estate today launched a new website to support industry collaboration in the emerging wave and tidal industry. Called the Wave and Tidal Knowledge Network, the website will make it easier for organisations ...
    1 year ago
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    andy
    andy is now a member of Marine Turbines In Orkney.
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    Lucky1
    Lucky1 commented on the group Marine Turbines In Orkney's wall:
    News release 30/10/12 from Xodus Group about the energy consultancy’s environmental work on a major tidal project in the Pentland Firth, Scotland. Xodus delivers for UK’s first commercial scale tidal energy project Independent, ...
    2 years ago
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    Lucky1
    Lucky1 commented on Marine Turbines In Orkney's picture.
    Picture : Liz Foubister, marine renewables specialist with Xodus
    2 years ago
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    Lucky1
    Lucky1 commented on Marine Turbines In Orkney's picture.
    Information taken from The Carbon Trust Website Revealed: the UK's wave power hot spots UK's most energetic sites could reduce wave power costs by 50% New research released today by the Carbon Trust has taken the most detailed look yet ...
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    A yellow U-Boat
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  • Lucky1
    by Lucky1 1 year ago
    16 September 2013

    Information from Xodusgroup


    Xodus celebrates development consent for the MeyGen tidal energy project in the Pentland Firth


    Independent, international energy consultancy Xodus Group is delighted to hear the announcement of consent for Europe’s largest tidal energy project in the Pentland Firth at the Scottish Renewables Marine Energy Conference.

    As lead consultant in the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for the 86MW Phase 1 MeyGen tidal energy project, Xodus played a pivotal role in the creation of the Environmental Statement (ES). The EIA considered the possible positive or negative impacts of the project on the local environment as well as potential social and economic aspects. The ES represented the culmination of four years’ of consultation, surveys and assessment, with the offshore and onshore applications submitted to the Scottish Government and The Highland Council in July 2012.

    Phase 1 of the MeyGen project will see the construction of up to 61 tidal turbines in the Inner Sound of the Pentland Firth between the Island of Stroma and the north east coast of the Scottish mainland. It will encompass almost 1.1km2 of fast flowing water and electricity generated will be exported onshore for transmission to the national grid. 86MW constitutes the first phase of a site that could eventually yield up to 398MW.
    Xodus is now well placed to undertake assessments for other similar innovative projects and will share its experiences of the project at the Scottish Renewables Marine Energy Conference which is taking place in Inverness on the 16th and 17th of September.

    Xodus is highly experienced in permit applications and environmental impact assessments. Through its fully integrated offering, it also delivers complete commercial solutions for renewable projects through its extensive suite of capabilities from engineering and project management to technical safety and risk management services.

    Liz Foubister, marine renewables specialist based in the Orkney office, said: “We are delighted that this significant project has gained development consent. Working closely with MeyGen throughout the EIA has resulted in a smooth approval process with minor clarifications required for the regulators and their advisors during the determination period. This clearly demonstrates the quality of work undertaken by Xodus and the EIA partners. We are continuing to support the MeyGen project and also look forward to fully utilising our broad range of capabilities in the offshore renewables sector on other similar innovative projects.”

    Xodus now boasts more than 25 offshore renewable energy clients and is committed to developing its low carbon and renewables business. The Xodus Orkney office is supporting wave and tidal technology developers at the European Marine Energy Centre (EMEC) in Orkney and a number of the Pentland Firth and Orkney Waters (PFOW) developers looking to develop commercial scale wave and tidal energy projects. The Orkney team in collaboration with 50 colleagues across the UK, are working on a number of local and international projects to help make wave, tidal and offshore wind power a sustainable reality.

    Ed Rollings, MeyGen’s Environment and Consent Manager, added: “As Europe’s largest consented tidal energy project, we are proud that the culmination of so many years of research, assessment and consultation has finally paid off and we look forward to the next stage of this exciting venture.

    “Xodus, as our lead EIA consultant, have provided their experience, knowledge and capabilities in this field to help facilitate the smooth progress of this significant project for the marine energy industry.”



    ENDS

    Picture caption: A graphic of the MeyGen tidal energy project, which will be Europe’s largest tidal energy project.

    Xodus Group
    The Aberdeen-headquartered consultancy which launched in 2005 has grown to more than 700 people and a turnover of £62million offering integrated services covering oil and gas and low carbon.

    Xodus has invested significantly in expansion with offices in Houston, Nigeria, The Hague, Norway, Australia and in the UK.

    For more information please visit www.xodusgroup.com


    MeyGen Limited
    MeyGen Limited is a joint venture between investment bank Morgan Stanley (45%), independent power generator GDF Suez (45%) and tidal technology supplier Atlantis Resources Corporation (10%), dedicated to developing the Inner Sound tidal site.
  • Lucky1
    by Lucky1 1 year ago
    16 September 2013


    Xodus celebrates development consent for the MeyGen tidal energy project in the Pentland Firth


    Independent, international energy consultancy Xodus Group is delighted to hear the announcement of consent for Europe’s largest tidal energy project in the Pentland Firth at the Scottish Renewables Marine Energy Conference.

    As lead consultant in the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for the 86MW Phase 1 MeyGen tidal energy project, Xodus played a pivotal role in the creation of the Environmental Statement (ES). The EIA considered the possible positive or negative impacts of the project on the local environment as well as potential social and economic aspects. The ES represented the culmination of four years’ of consultation, surveys and assessment, with the offshore and onshore applications submitted to the Scottish Government and The Highland Council in July 2012.

    Phase 1 of the MeyGen project will see the construction of up to 61 tidal turbines in the Inner Sound of the Pentland Firth between the Island of Stroma and the north east coast of the Scottish mainland. It will encompass almost 1.1km2 of fast flowing water and electricity generated will be exported onshore for transmission to the national grid. 86MW constitutes the first phase of a site that could eventually yield up to 398MW.
    Xodus is now well placed to undertake assessments for other similar innovative projects and will share its experiences of the project at the Scottish Renewables Marine Energy Conference which is taking place in Inverness on the 16th and 17th of September.

    Xodus is highly experienced in permit applications and environmental impact assessments. Through its fully integrated offering, it also delivers complete commercial solutions for renewable projects through its extensive suite of capabilities from engineering and project management to technical safety and risk management services.

    Liz Foubister, marine renewables specialist based in the Orkney office, said: “We are delighted that this significant project has gained development consent. Working closely with MeyGen throughout the EIA has resulted in a smooth approval process with minor clarifications required for the regulators and their advisors during the determination period. This clearly demonstrates the quality of work undertaken by Xodus and the EIA partners. We are continuing to support the MeyGen project and also look forward to fully utilising our broad range of capabilities in the offshore renewables sector on other similar innovative projects.”

    Xodus now boasts more than 25 offshore renewable energy clients and is committed to developing its low carbon and renewables business. The Xodus Orkney office is supporting wave and tidal technology developers at the European Marine Energy Centre (EMEC) in Orkney and a number of the Pentland Firth and Orkney Waters (PFOW) developers looking to develop commercial scale wave and tidal energy projects. The Orkney team in collaboration with 50 colleagues across the UK, are working on a number of local and international projects to help make wave, tidal and offshore wind power a sustainable reality.

    Ed Rollings, MeyGen’s Environment and Consent Manager, added: “As Europe’s largest consented tidal energy project, we are proud that the culmination of so many years of research, assessment and consultation has finally paid off and we look forward to the next stage of this exciting venture.

    “Xodus, as our lead EIA consultant, have provided their experience, knowledge and capabilities in this field to help facilitate the smooth progress of this significant project for the marine energy industry.”



    ENDS

    Picture caption: A graphic of the MeyGen tidal energy project, which will be Europe’s largest tidal energy project.

    Xodus Group
    The Aberdeen-headquartered consultancy which launched in 2005 has grown to more than 700 people and a turnover of £62million offering integrated services covering oil and gas and low carbon.

    Xodus has invested significantly in expansion with offices in Houston, Nigeria, The Hague, Norway, Australia and in the UK.

    For more information please visit www.xodusgroup.com


    MeyGen Limited
    MeyGen Limited is a joint venture between investment bank Morgan Stanley (45%), independent power generator GDF Suez (45%) and tidal technology supplier Atlantis Resources Corporation (10%), dedicated to developing the Inner Sound tidal site.
  • Lucky1
    by Lucky1 1 year ago
    Information from BBC News http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-23146280

    E.ON pulls out of Orkney Pelamis marine energy project



    The German power giant E.ON is pulling out of a marine energy research project in Orkney.

    E.ON had been working with Pelamis Wave Energy, based in Edinburgh, to test one of the company's wave energy converters at the European Marine Energy Centre.

    E.ON has blamed the decision on delays in the development of wave energy technology.

    It said it will now focus its efforts on wind, biomass and solar energy instead.

    A spokeswoman told BBC Scotland the company still believed marine energy could provide commercial opportunities in the future.

    She said: "Delays in wave technology progress and a focus in E.ON on other more mature renewable technologies have been part of the decision to reduce our level of effort in the marine area.

    "Having successfully built up a leading position in the marine energy area, we will continue to monitor technologies and work towards being prepared when marine energy is more mature and we are in the right position to move forward."

    'Solid platform'

    Pelamis Wave Power said the decision by E.ON would not affect its plans to begin generating electricity on a commercial scale.

    The company will continue to work with Scottish Power
  • Lucky1
    by Lucky1 1 year ago
    EMEC celebrates tenth anniversary
    Press release from EMEC:
    The European Marine Energy Centre – the world’s first and only test centre for wave and tidal energy devices – celebrates its tenth anniversary this month, with the pioneering Orkney based facility planning a host of events to mark its milestone year.

    The centre, which started off with just four wave test berths at Billia Croo, on the west coast of the Orkney mainland, has expanded considerably over the past decade. Now it operates six grid connected wave test berths at Billia Croo, and eight tidal test berths at the Fall of Warness, off the island of Eday. Two smaller-scale wave and tidal test sites are also available for device, technique and component testing in less challenging sea conditions.

    All of EMEC’s test berths are currently contracted out to marine energy developers as the industry moves closer to its goal of full scale commercialisation of wave and tidal technologies.

    Crucially, EMEC’s presence has sparked the growth of an entirely new industry in Orkney, with increasing numbers of local businesses now diversifying into the marine renewables sector. Recent figures show that marine energy supports around 250 jobs in the islands, with EMEC’s clients injecting approximately £1m per device into the local economy. Staffing at EMEC has almost doubled during the past three years, with the centre now employing over 20 people in Orkney.

    Instrumental in the creation of international standards for wave and tidal testing, EMEC’s knowledge and expertise in the marine energy field continues to be sought around the world. Staff from the Stromness headquartered facility are assisting with the development of marine energy centres in Canada, USA, Japan, China, Taiwan and South Korea, with several other nations seeking EMEC’s advice on testing.

    It was in 2001 that a House of Commons Select Science and Technology Committee recommended a test centre should be created to help develop a marine energy industry in the UK. Orkney was chosen as the site for the centre because of the power of the waves and tidal currents around the islands, its sheltered harbours and its connection to the national grid.

    EMEC was set up in 2003, with over £30 million of public funding invested to date from Highlands and Islands Enterprise, Scottish Enterprise, the Scottish and UK governments, Orkney Islands Council, the European Union and the Carbon Trust. The centre remains independent and is now self-financing.

    The Billia Croo test site was opened in 2004 and later that year the Pelamis 750 became the first floating wave energy device in the world to generate electricity to the national grid. Two years later EMEC opened its tidal test site at the Fall of Warness and, in 2008, Open Hydro’s 250Kw turbine became the first tidal energy converter to generate electricity to the UK grid. The wave and tidal test sites were expanded in 2010, with EMEC’s smaller scale test facilities opened the following year.

    EMEC’s technical director John Griffiths has been with the centre since day one. A chemical engineer with extensive oil and gas experience, he led a team of experts which drew up a report on marine energy for the Department of Trade and Industry back in 1999 and first mooted the idea of an independent test centre for wave and tidal devices. He later went on to assist Highlands and Islands Enterprise with studies aimed at identifying the best location for the new centre and subsequently found himself helping turn visionary plan into reality.

    “We effectively started out with a blank sheet of paper and had to make it up as we went along,” says John, reflecting on EMEC’s early days. “Nobody had ever created a facility for testing wave and tidal devices before. Equally, developers back then were taking a step into what was unknown engineering territory, trying to design technologies to function in the most hostile of environments.

    “It was all done on a shoestring and none of us realised the enormity of what we were doing, least of all the developers. Every time we came across a problem we’d sit down and think about how we were going to deal with it. We got lots of things wrong and, in the early days, we relied heavily on the very few leading companies around who were all struggling themselves, limping along between grants. We spent a lot of time lobbying to persuade people this was an industry that needed to be supported. It was all very pioneering and, at times, very iffy!”

    John adds: “I just stand amazed when I look at what’s been achieved to date as creating a test centre was a complete step of faith. Nowadays, I’m never afraid to say I work for EMEC because everybody smiles. It’s liked and it’s valued and I think it’s brought a lot to Orkney.”

    In addition to a burgeoning local supply chain, increasing numbers of graduates are also finding opportunities in Orkney’s marine energy sector, with EMEC’s data technician Adele Lidderdale amongst them. The 27-year-old from Kirkwall gained a BSc (Hons) in Sustainable Rural Development from the University of the Highlands and Islands, with the course delivered locally by Orkney College.

    “Marine renewables is a fresh and exciting industry that’s creating a real buzz around Orkney and I knew it was something I wanted to be involved in when deciding what and where to study,” says Adele, who joined EMEC in May 2012. “Being able to undertake my course at home in Orkney, at the heart of the marine renewables industry, was essential as it introduced me to people already working in the sector and gave me the chance to develop a better understanding of wave and tidal technologies.”

    Adele is now responsible for the quality control of a number of data streams from EMEC’s test sites. She creates reports from the data gathered, providing developers with information that’s vital for their testing programmes.

    “Marine renewables is proving to be everything I hoped it would be,” adds Adele. “It’s varied and challenging and I enjoy that sense of being involved with a pioneering industry trying to help solve the world’s energy problems.”

    EMEC will be celebrating its tenth anniversary at this month’s All Energy conference in Aberdeen, with the centre’s managing director Neil Kermode addressing delegates attending the event’s special wave and tidal sessions. EMEC’s clients will also give updates on the technologies currently undergoing testing in Orkney in the newly created Wave and Tidal Seminar.

    And plans are being developed for a Test Centre Symposium event which will see wave and tidal test facility providers from around the world gather in Orkney later this year to see first hand the flagship marine energy development work being done in the islands. The symposium will give representatives the chance to discuss common challenges for test sites and identify opportunities for collaboration, export and further sharing of knowledge via a global network of leading marine energy clusters.

    EMEC has already launched and distributed a new general information leaflet explaining its work and highlighting the importance of Orkney’s part in the development of the global marine renewables industry. Educational resources for local schools are also being created to generate interest in marine renewables amongst younger people and help develop the future supply chain.

    The centre, which has had a special new 10th anniversary logo designed, will also be erecting commemorative landmarks at its test sites and assisting with the development of a marine renewables exhibition in Stromness.

    “From the outset we made it our aim to respond and adapt to the needs of the emerging wave and tidal industry, while also endeavouring to create globally recognised standards and structures for testing,” says EMEC’s managing director Neil Kermode. “We’ve grown as the industry has grown and everyone at EMEC is immensely proud to have played a part in making Orkney the world centre for marine energy development that it is today. More marine energy activity is now taking place in Orkney than at any other location in the world, with a significant support chain industry developing in the islands. But none of what’s been achieved so far would have been possible without the support of the Orkney community and the commitment of the public and private sector.

    “A decade is a significant milestone to have passed, but the marine energy industry is still in its infancy, with many challenges – including the thorny issue of grid connection and transmission charging – to overcome before full-scale wave and tidal arrays become a commercially viable reality.

    “The technology works, of that there is no question, but developers and investors now need to increase the reliability and work out how large arrays of multiple machines can be built, installed and operated, safely, efficiently and cost-effectively. One of our roles at EMEC over the next few years will be to provide help to developers negotiating the difficult path towards commercial deployment and we anticipate this input will become even greater as major array deployment along the world’s coastlines becomes a reality.”

    Mr Kermode added: “It gives us enormous pleasure to be able to share our anniversary celebrations with industry colleagues and the local community and we look forward to helping protect and strengthen Orkney’s role as marine energy’s elder statesman over the next decade, and beyond.”
  • Lucky1
    by Lucky1 1 year ago
    Wednesday, April 24, 2013



    The Crown Estate today launched a new website to support industry collaboration in the emerging wave and tidal industry. Called the Wave and Tidal Knowledge Network, the website will make it easier for organisations to share information with each other and help deliver industry growth.
    http://www.waveandtidalknowledgenetwork.com/
  • Lucky1
    by Lucky1 2 years ago
    News release 30/10/12 from Xodus Group about the energy consultancy’s environmental work on a major tidal project in the Pentland Firth, Scotland.


    Xodus delivers for UK’s first commercial scale tidal energy project



    Independent, international energy consultancy Xodus Group has been retained by MeyGen Ltd to provide further environmental support for a major tidal project in the Pentland Firth, Scotland.



    The initial contract for Phase 1 of the project, was awarded in March 2011 and is now valued at more than £450,000. The work conducted to date has considered the possible positive or negative impacts of the project on the local environment as well as potential social and economic aspects.



    Up to 86 1MW tidal turbines are planned for Phase 1 of the project. The turbines will be located in approximately 1.1km2 of the Inner Sound of the Pentland Firth off the north coast of Scotland between Caithness on the Scottish mainland and the Island of Stroma. The electricity generated from the project will be exported onshore for transmission to the national grid.



    The Environmental Statement (ES) supporting the offshore marine license application and onshore planning application for the MeyGen Phase 1 Tidal Energy Project was submitted to Marine Scotland and the Highland Council in July 2012. A nine month determination period now follows with the outcome expected in April 2013.



    Prepared by Xodus through its work with the developer MeyGen and other specialist consultants, the ES represents the culmination of four years’ of consultation, surveys and assessment.

    Xodus is highly experienced in permit applications and environmental impact assessments. Through its fully integrated offering, it also delivers complete commercial solutions for renewable projects through its extensive suite of capabilities from engineering and project management to technical safety and risk management services.



    The group now boasts more than 25 offshore renewable energy clients and is committed to developing its low carbon and renewables business. The Low Carbon team has 20 people at its Orkney office who, in collaboration with 50 colleagues across the UK, are working on a number of local and international projects to help make wave, tidal and offshore wind power a sustainable reality. As a rapidly growing sector, the team recently welcomed five new members of staff who will be based throughout the UK.



    Liz Foubister, marine renewables specialist based in the Orkney office, said: “This is a significant project globally. Xodus has seen the potential of commercial scale wave and tidal projects in the Pentland Firth and Orkney waters since it was first touted more than a decade ago. Working with MeyGen has allowed the company to fully utilize its broad range of capabilities in this sector and has enabled the growth of not only our team but also our technical expertise and service offering.



    “We continue to enjoy a great working relationship with MeyGen who have been extremely cooperative throughout the project. We hope they have learnt as much from us as we have about them and the growing tidal market.”



    Liz Foubister will be presenting a paper on the experiences gained from the UK’s first large scale tidal turbine Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) at Renewable UK, taking place from 30th October to 1st November in Glasgow.



    MeyGen’s Environment and Consents Manager Ed Rollings, added: “The relationship with the Xodus project team throughout the whole EIA process has been exceptional and they have produced an Environmental Statement that everyone involved can be very proud of.”
  • Lucky1
    by Lucky1 2 years ago
    The embedded code for this has been disabled so is unable to be displayed here but copy and paste this link into your browser to see the video.

    http://youtu.be/rWdLLnzXWCU



    Underwater energy turbine passes test period with flying colours
    www.youtube.com
    An underwater turbine destined to form part of a major green energy project is already using tidal power to produce electricity for homes on a northern island.
  • Lucky1
    by Lucky1 2 years ago
    Rolls-Royce tidal device powers past 200MWh electricity supply mark

    Green innovation news - by GreenWise staff

    13th March 2012

    A Rolls-Royce-owned tidal turbine being tested off the Orkney Islands achieved a milestone in power generation this week.

    Tidal Generation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Rolls-Royce, said yesterday the 500 kilowatt prototype tidal turbine had reached 200-megawatt hours (MWh) of electricity supply to the National Grid. The three-bladed turbine, which can operate fully submerged at water depth of 40 metres, is being tested at the European Marine Energy Centre’s (EMEC) offshore test site off the Orkney Islands in Scotland.

    More funding needed
    The tidal project is as part of Deep-Gen III, a programme part-funded by the Government-backed Technology Strategy Board. But Tidal Generation said more Government support and incentives would be required to ensure the tidal device could achieve its commercial potential.

    "We are delighted to have exceeded 200 megawatt hours of electricity supply to the grid with our tidal technology," Robert Stevenson, ceo, Tidal Generation, said. "This demonstrates the tremendous potential of tidal as a cleaner, greener source of energy. Government support and incentives will be required to create the necessary investment climate to bring the technology to commercial scale, competitive with other renewable sources."

    How it works
    Attached by a tripod to the seabed, Rolls-Royce’s innovative tidal device continually rotates to face the incoming tide at an optimal angle and is semi-buoyant, meaning it can easily be towed to and from the point of operation, minimising installation and maintenance costs by avoiding the need for specialist vessels, according to its developers.

    Rolls-Royce is currently building a one megawatt tidal turbine demonstration unit that will be deployed in mid-2012 at EMEC in Orkney.

    EMEC is the first centre of its kind to offer developers the opportunity to test full-scale prototypes in the sea. Other devices tested there include wave power device, Pelamis, the Oyster wave power device, and the world's largest single-rotor tidal turbine, built by Atlantis.
  • Lucky1
    by Lucky1 2 years ago
    .

    Wednesday 15 February 2012 Text size Two more Oyster devices for Orkney's wave farm
    Highland Correspondent.
    Power generated by an arrangement of "near-shore" wave devices should soon be feeding into the National Grid for the first time in Scotland.
    inShare.0
    David Ross
    Two new Oyster wave energy converters will be added to an existing device at the European Marine Energy Centre (EMEC) at Billia Croo on the Orkney mainland, to allow operators Aquamarine Power to test the devices as an array. The Scottish Government granted its consent for the project on Monday.


    Martin McAdam, chief executive of Aquamarine, said: "This is clear evidence Scotland is not only leading the way in marine energy technology, but shows that regulator Marine Scotland is putting in place the timely and efficient consent and permitting processes which will enable our industry to grow.

    "Consents are vital. A clear pathway to all the necessary permits for marine energy development is one of the critical enablers for a business such as ours, and countries which lack a transparent and timely system will fall behind. We installed the first Oyster 800 device in September, and the consent means we can now install a further two Oyster wave energy devices at the same site at the European Marine Energy Centre in Orkney.

    "The Oyster 800 array will consist of three 800kW Oyster devices and will be the UK's first grid-connected near-shore wave power array.

    "It paves the way for us to continue working with Marine Scotland to further streamline the consents process and gain all the necessary consents for our 200MW wave energy site in Orkney, and our 40MW site on Lewis."

    The Oyster device is a simple mechanical hinged flap connected to the seabed at 30 feet to 40 feet depth and about 550 yards from the shore. Each passing wave moves the flap, driving hydraulic pistons to deliver high pressure water via a pipeline to an onshore station.

    Energy Minster Fergus Ewing said: "I am delighted to grant consent to these two new Oyster devices, the first near-shore wave array in Scotland to feed in to the National Grid.

    "This array will supply more than 1,000 homes with clean energy, and should the demonstrator be successful the technology being developed here will power hundreds of thousands more homes in future."
    Article sourced from The Herald Scotland written by David Ross
  • Lucky1
    by Lucky1 2 years ago
    Orkney underwater turbine ready for testing
    Posted on: December 26th, 2011 by Beth Williams
    Installation of a 100ft underwater power turbine near Orkney is now complete and it is being readied for its final operations test. If it operates as manufacturers say it will, the one megawatt turbine should produce enough power to satisfy the requirements of 500 households.
    Developers hope the HS1000 turbine will eventually be used for the Sound of Islay tidal energy project. This project is the globe’s largest planned development of this nature to date and those who back it say it indicates a major breakthrough in the field of renewable energy.
    Hammerfest Strom developed the turbine and it has been installed at Orkney’s Marine Energy Centre. Engineers will now run exacting tests to determine the device’s performance levels and reliability. If the tests prove successful, the HS1000 will then be manufactured in larger quantities.
    Stein Atle Andersen, the boss of Hammerfest Strom, said the successful installation of the turbine in some of the most tricky seas in Europe, and at the worst time of the year, was a fitting demonstration of the operations team’s skills and versatility.
    Scottish first minister Alex Salmond issued his own endorsement by saying the project and turbine represented a fine ending to a year in which renewable energy had made fantastic progress. He also said the successful conclusion was a testament to the abilities of the project engineers.
    Mr Salmond added that investments of £750 million in the field had already gone live, while another massive £46 billion had been earmarked for projects.
    Scottish national World Wide Fund director Richard Dixon said it was a great advance in the harnessing of renewable marine energy to produce clean and green electricity. He continued by saying there was lots of power in Scotland’s seas and engineers had excellent offshore engineering skills, which represented an excellent opportunity for the country to lead the way in reducing harmful climate emissions.
    One interested observer of the proceedings is ScottishPower Renewables (SPR) chief Keith Anderson. The organisation is awaiting test results on the HS1000 before it can finalise plans for the £40 million project that will see a bank of the devices set up at Islay.
    Mr Anderson said SPR was delighted over the turbine’s successful installation and was eagerly waiting performance test results. Planning permission for the Islay turbine development was given by the Scottish Government last March.
    If the Orkney HS1000 tests go through without any major issues, SPR hopes to have its Islay turbines in place some time between 2013 and 2015. It is hoped the combined output of these will provide power for 5,000 homes

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